ULISSES brings together three academic institutions with five companies (four of which are from high tech industry) coming from 5 different European countries (Germany, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and UK). Between them, they cover the full range of competences from theoretical 2D material modelling to sensor system networking, i.e. all that is needed to bring the new gas sensor SoC to TRL4.
Stacks Image 59
The ULISSES Consortium at the Kick-off meeting, hosted by Senseair in Stockholm, Sweden.
The composition of the consortium has evolved from previous fruitful collaborations between and among nearly all partners of the consortium. Several partners have been involved in successful FP7 and H2020 research, and key advances achieved there will naturally flow into the ULISSES research work, thus helping make the most of earlier research supported by the EU. Earlier (and in many cases on-going) collaborations are numerous and varied, based on activities such as shared research projects, publications in journals and books, participation in committees, joint teaching in graduate programmes, participation in conferences and other events.

The ULISSES consortium has been built around the two primary objectives of ULISSES. Each of the consortium partners contributes their expertise and resources to two or more technical work packages. Ultimately, the composition of the consortium and the shared expertise provide an efficient risk management and ensures close interaction and synergy between the work packages. The added value of the consortium will be generated by the coordination of the complementary scientific or methodological expertise of the individual partners.
Stacks Image 901
The ULISSES Consortium at the Kick-off meeting, hosted by Senseair in Stockholm, Sweden.
ULISSES brings together three academic institutions with five companies (four of which are from high tech industry) coming from 5 different European countries (Germany, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and UK). Between them, they cover the full range of competences from theoretical 2D material modelling to sensor system networking, i.e. all that is needed to bring the new gas sensor SoC to TRL4.

The composition of the consortium has evolved from previous fruitful collaborations between and among nearly all partners of the consortium. Several partners have been involved in successful FP7 and H2020 research, and key advances achieved there will naturally flow into the ULISSES research work, thus helping make the most of earlier research supported by the EU. Earlier (and in many cases on-going) collaborations are numerous and varied, based on activities such as shared research projects, publications in journals and books, participation in committees, joint teaching in graduate programmes, participation in conferences and other events.

The ULISSES consortium has been built around the two primary objectives of ULISSES. Each of the consortium partners contributes their expertise and resources to two or more technical work packages. Ultimately, the composition of the consortium and the shared expertise provide an efficient risk management and ensures close interaction and synergy between the work packages. The added value of the consortium will be generated by the coordination of the complementary scientific or methodological expertise of the individual partners.
Senseair will specify the gas sensor system and guide the waveguide-based gas-sensor design and implementation. Furthermore, Senseair will lead the work on sensor intelligence and demonstrators.
Senseair has about 150 employees and the organization covers everything from being a world leading competence centre in R&D within optical gas sensor technologies, to an agile lean-striving production system that handles everything between rapid industrialization projects to high volume production. Senseair is currently developing next generation miniaturized on-chip integrated optical gas sensor.
Scientific projects with direct relevance: SOI Grafen, governmentally funded Swedish project aiming at chip- sized gas sensors. CO2.global, EU-funded project developing an infrastructure for air quality monitoring by providing real-time information based on low cost and high precision, wireless and autonomous CO2 sensors.
Dr. Hans Martin
CTO and the founder of Senseair AB, received his Ph.D. at Stockholm University in 1982 in molecular spectroscopy. His visionary optical designs have resulted in innovative sensor products with excellent stability in combination with low production costs. Dr. Martin is the author of more than 50 scientific articles and 20 patents. He is also active in many scientific networks together with Swedish and international universities as well as research institutes.
Dr. Henrik Rödjegård
is a senior scientist at SenseAir. He obtained his PhD degree at Chalmers University of Technology in 2005 within the field of MEMS. His research on infrared gas sensing includes modelling, algorithms, electronics, optics, andapplications. With his more than twelve years of experience from research at Senseair he is the optimum link between the PhD-students at KTH, and Senseair. Prof. Rödjegård has more than 40 peer reviewed publications (h-index 12).
The main activities at AMICA address research on More Than Moore and Beyond CMOS devices in cooperation with leading European academic and industrial partners. The current focus lies mainly on graphene based electronic and opto-electronic devices and silicon- photonics. These activities are supported by research on advanced nanolithography techniques.
The research and development activities in the field of graphene based electronics started in 2006. Several national and European projects in the field of graphene based electronics and opto-electronics have been coordinated. The main focus of research is currently on the design and realization of different electronic and opto-electronic devices with a focus on communication, computing and sensing applications. Processing of graphene devices is currently preformed on chip level and on wafer level. A foundry service for silicon photonic devices has recently been lunched at AMO.
Prof. Max Lemme
is the Director of AMO GmbH and Full Professor at RWTH Aachen University. He obtained his PhD degree from RWTH in 2004. In 1998 he joined AMO, where he later became Head of the Technology Department. He has worked in the field of nano-CMOS devices, including FinFET and SOI- MOSFETs, novel high-k /metal gate stacks and graphene and 2D materials. The latter includes the world’s first top-gated graphene MOSFET, a novel graphene-based nonvolatile memory, vertical graphene transistors and graphene NEMS. He received the “NanoFutur” young researchers’ award from the German Ministry for Education and Research in 2006 and a Lynen Research Fellowship from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation in 2007 to join Harvard University in Cambridge, USA. In September 2010, he became Professor at KTH, where he initiated the graphene activities within the School of ICT. He received an ERC Starting Grant and became Full Professor at the University of Siegen with a DFG Heisenberg-Professorship in 2012. In 2017, Prof. Lemme was appointed Full professor at RWTH Aachen University and Scientific Director of AMO GmbH. He has managed several German BMBF Projects with industrial semiconductor foundries like Infineon, AMD and Qimonda and was the coordinator of the FP 7 EU Projects “GRAND” and “GRADE”.
Dr. Daniel Neumaier
is head of a research group at AMO GmbH since 2009 focusing on the exploitation of two-dimensional materials in microelectronics and photonics. He studied physics and obtained his PhD degree in 2009. In the last years he has gained strong experience in semiconductor processing and electronic and opto-electronic devices. He is or was principle investigator in 4 national and 7 EU projects on electronic and photonic devices, and has been the coordinator of FP7 and national projects (GRAND and GRATIS). Daniel Neumaier has been organizing several international conferences and schools (EuroCarbon 2010, Graphene Week 2013, X-Mas School on Spintronic 2014, GrapheneStudy 2015 and 2017). He published >50 papers with in total > 3000 citations; his h-index is 23.
The KTH researchers focus on MEMS/NEMS and its applications in sensors, optical, radio frequency, medical and biotechnology components and on electronic devices, including graphene transistors and photodetectors. KTH-MST has a strong track record in industry-related projects, including of waveguide-based sensors, IR bolometers and IR emitters. Three KTH-MST research leaders have ERC grants: Advanced Grant in 2010 to G. Stemme, Starting Grant in 2011 to F. Niklaus and Consolidator Grant to J. Oberhammer in 2013.
Assoc. Prof. Kristinn B. Gylfason
received the PhD degree in Electrical Engineering from KTH in 2010. He received the largest Young Researcher grant awarded by the Swedish Research Council to KTH in 2011, as well as the Göran Gustafsson Young Researcher Price in 2012. In 2015, he co-founded the startup Grein Research in Reykjavik, Iceland. Kristinn is the KTH PI of the H2020 MORPHIC project, was WP leader in FP7 Positive, and has participated in three European FP6 and FP7 projects. His research involves photonic nanodevices for biomedical, sensing, and communications applications. He has co-authored 22 peer reviewed scientific journal publications and has presented his works in more than 40 conferences.
Prof. Frank Niklaus
received his PhD degree in MEMS from KTH in 2002. Since 2013 he is a Professor with the Department of Micro and Nanosystems at KTH. His research includes manufacturing, integration, and packaging for MEMS and NEMS. Dr. Niklaus was the PI of the ERC-M&M’s Starting Grant “New Paradigms for MEMS & NEMS Integration”. In addition, Dr. Niklaus has been involved in 6 successfully completed EU- research projects, incl. EU-FP7-ICU as Project Coordinator (2008-2012), EU-FP7 NEMIAC (2011-2015), EU-FP7-FNIR (2008-2010) and EU-FP7-ELITE (2007-2011). Dr. Niklaus has co-authored more than 190 journal and conference papers and is co-inventor of more than 10 patents.
Assoc. Prof. Tobias Oechtering
received his Dr.-Ing. degree in Elect. Eng. in 2007 from the TU Berlin. Since May 2013 he has been an Assoc. Prof. at the Information Science and Engineering Department at KTH. Since 2016 he is editor of the IEEE Trans. Inf. Forensic and Security. Among some paper awards, he was recipient of the “Vodafone Förderpreis” 2009. In 2010 he was awarded an SRA ICT-TNG starting grant, in 2012 a VR Junior Research grant and in 2016 a VR Project grant. Currently, he is coordinator of the European CHIST-ERA project COPES (2015-18) with KTH, ETH, Imperial College London and INRIA as partners, where similar statistical methods as proposed here are used. Dr. Oechtering published more than 100 conference papers and 34 journal papers.
There is an excellent fit to its role as the equipment partner in this project which aims to address challenges related to scaling up of a novel graphene based photonic gas sensor module of which equipment suitability is one of the many critical nodes in the supply chain. It has participated in several collaborative projects, and is currently active in the FP7 project ‘Single nanometer manufacturing’ (SNM) and two ENIAC projects preparing for a possible transition to 450mm silicon. OXINST will undertake tasks related to benchmarking and improving the costs of manufacturing the proposed novel devices within WP3. This will involve studies on tool to tool and wafer to wafer reproducibility as well as strategies to reduce graphene deposition time and temperature.
Dr Ravi Sundaram
is a Senior Development Scientist and Market Manger for emerging technologies at OXINST. He has been involved in 2d materials research in several institutions such as EPFL, Switzerland, Max Planck Institute Stuttgart, Germany, IBM Watson Research Labs, NY. He was conferred a PhD in Physics in 2011 and moved to Cambridge university as a research fellow before joining Oxford Instruments in March 2014. He has been involved in graphene and 2D materials research for over 9 years and has produced research outputs in fundamental properties, materials fabrication as well as electronics and optoelectronic device applications of these materials. He has participated in several EU projects during his experience including the Marie-Curie ITN –GENIUS and Flag ERA Net 2DFUN and played a key role in the EPSRC funding grant and first phase development of the Cambridge Graphene Centre.
He is the lead scientist for the 2D materials effort at OI was responsible for developing the deposition tool as well as processes. His current role is to scope out emerging technology markets and advise on the Oxford Instruments plasma technology strategy for product development to address these markets.
Dr Mike Cooke
joined OXINST in 1992 as senior technologist, and is currently Chief Technology Officer at the OIPT business. He was part of the development team for the 80+, 100, 300+, 400, Nanofab and FlexAl and Opal process modules for plasma etching, plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition, sputtering and atomic layer deposition, and helped develop four plasma sources, two ion sources, and the range of wafer tables including a wide temperature range ‘cryo-table’ for cryogenic etching and a 1200C table for 2D material growth. He is a co-inventor for five of OIPT’s patents.
He is also currently responsible for product safety, intellectual property, and for collaboration projects. Mike led the company’s participation in several collaboration projects including: FP6 project Nanoplasma, ENIAC projects for 450mm silicon readiness EEMI450, EEMI450PR and E450LMDAP; and FP7 project Single Nanometre Manufacturing, in which the prototype ALE module was developed. He was named an ‘Oxford Instruments Fellow’ in 2016.
Graphenea specialises in the synthesis, transfer and characterisation of high quality graphene films via CVD. In addition, Graphenea also manufactures chemically exfoliated graphene in the form of graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide. Graphenea’s IP strategy is to give priority to patenting rather than publishing, specially if the scientific discovery is related to the core of Graphenea’s business which is the production of graphene materials. Graphenea has so far filed for nine patents.
Graphenea will work on the growth, transfer and characterisation of wafer scale graphene (200mm).
Graphenea has the necessary equipment to grow and manipulate nanomaterials such as graphene and h- BN that include three cold-walled CVD reactors (100mm, 150mm and 200mm) and two hot-walled reactors. In addition, Graphenea has graphene transfer process lines, standard chemical reactors and mixing equipment (high shear mixer, ball mill, etc.).
Dr. Amaia Zurutuza
is the scientific director of GRAPHENEA and currently supervises eight R&D scientists. During her time in GRAPHENEA (April 2010 - present) she has so far filed for nine patents and has more than 55 publications. Previously, she worked in Ferring Pharmaceuticals (Scotland) for six years in the research and development of new controlled drug delivery systems. Her contribution in controlled therapeutics led to the granting of three patents in novel biodegradable and biostable polymers for controlling drug delivery. She obtained her PhD from the University of Strathclyde, UK and has worked as a postdoctoral research scientist in two European projects.
Dr Alba Centeno Perez
graduated in Chemistry by the University of Oviedo. She carried out her doctoral studies in INCAR-CSIC in the field of Carbon based materials. As a result of the scientific impact of her thesis she received an award by the University of Oviedo for the best PhD Thesis defended in the field of Materials Science in the years 2010-2011. She joined GRAPHENEA in 2010 as Research Scientist and is author and co-author of more than 50 publications including 3 patents. Her research interest includes carbon-based materials, fabrication and characterization, with special emphasis on Graphene. She did several short stays in Centers such as the Microsystems Technology Laboratories of MassachusettsInstitute of Technology (MIT), Institute Heterogeneous Materials Systems of Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energieand ST Microelectronics in order to extend her expertise in Graphene field and promote graphene into industrial applications.
Facilities at the UNIBW M include two clean rooms equipped with state-of-the art tools. It has wafer-scale sputter and evaporation tools, and crucially a wafer scale metal MBE tool important for the deposition of PtSe2. Further dedicated deposition of TMDs and ALD tools up to 4’ wafers are available. The UNIBW M has excellent analytic capabilities. The surface analysis lab has scanning electron microscopy, scanning probe tools (AFM, STM), XPS, micro XPS, Raman imaging, and TOF-SIMS tools. For electrical testing semiautomatic, manual and vacuum probers are available.
Georg S. Duesberg
gained his PhD in 2001 at the Max Planck Institute, Stuttgart. From 2001 to 2005 he worked at the Corporate Research Department of Infineon AG, in Munich. The research focus was the integration of bottom-up grown structures into CMOS devices. Wafer-scale CVD of CNTs and growth of individual nanotubes from lithographically defined nano-holes are among his achievements. He was part of a team producing the world’s smallest transistor and the first power transistor with CNT. In 2005 he joined the Thin Films Dept of Qimonda AG, Dresden, working on DRAM integration. In July 2007 he became Professor in the School of Chemistry in Trinity College Dublin and Principal Investigator in the national Center for Research and Adaptive Nanostructures and NanoDevices (CRANN). In 2017 he took on the Chair in Sensortechnologies in the Institute of Physics of the UNIBW M. He has a proven track record in several national, international and industrial collaborations. He has 25 patents in the field of nano-materials and more than 220 publications with an h-index 63/54 (Google/Reuters). He received the ETS Walton prize in 2007 and the Qimonda Innovation Award in 2008.
Dr. Chanyoung Yim
received his PhD at Trinity College Dublin in 2015 after working for five years at Samsung Electronics as Senior Engineer. He was a postdoctoral researcher at University of Siegen, Germany with Prof. Max C. Lemme from 2015-17. He joined UNIBW M in August 2017. His research work includes the fabrication of novel nanoelectronic devices using low-dimensional materials, such as graphene and TMDs, as well as the analysis of their charge transport and electrical properties. He has published 21 papers in high-impact peer-reviewed journals (h-index 11, Scopus).
Dr. Tanja Stimpel-Lindner
obtained her diploma in physics from the LMU Munich in 1998 and a PhD in the field of surface and interface physics from the UNIBW M in 2003. Since then, she has been working as a scientific laboratory manager and lecturer. She has collaborated on many projects in the fields of semiconductor devices, surfaces and interfaces and materials characterization, e.g. Si-Ge and Si-C devices, CVD of semiconductors and polymer membranes. Her publications include 12 articles in internationally reviewed journals and 28 articles in conference proceedings, with an overall h-index of 6.
Dr Kangho Lee
obtained a PhD in Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Korea University, Seoul, in 2012. He works on electrical properties of graphene and TMD materials of Postgraduate Researcher at Trinity College Dublin. He has been involved in a number of national, international and industry related projects involving the characterization and integration of TMDs. In particular he has publish some high profile papers on gas sensing with low-dimensional materials. He joined the UNIBW M by the 1st Dec 2017
With 17 research units or departments and 3 Specialised Technical Divisions, ICN2 promotes collaboration among scientists from diverse backgrounds (physics, chemistry, biology, and engineering) to develop basic and applied research while seeking interactions with local and global industry. ICN2 trains researchers in nanotechnology, develops numerous activities to facilitate the uptake of nanotechnology by industry, and promotes networking among scientists, engineers, technicians, business people, society, and policy makers. ICN2 plays an active role in disseminating nanoscience to a broad audience, interacting closely with universities, research and technology centres. ICN2 numbers some 200 staff from over 30 countries, of which about 170 are researchers. ICN2’s achievements were recently recognised by the Spanish government via the prestigious Severo Ochoa Centre of Excellence accreditation in 2014 – one of only 18 centres in Spain to hold the award. ICN2 is consistently ranked among the top 10 of Spanish research institutes in terms of excellence in scientific publications (SCIMAGO rankings). One half of ICN2’s budget comes from competitive grants or industry projects, including ERC grants and coordinated FET projects.
ICN2’s Theoretical and Computational Nanoscience Group, headed by Stephan Roche, studies quantum transport and device simulation using efficient in-house computational methodologies. Combining first- principles simulation with order-N real-space approaches, the group has a long track record in modelling complex graphene-based materials and devices, extracting charge mobilities of realistic models of graphene compounds, and developing multiscale approaches to provide device characteristics comparable with experimental data. The group has collaborated with companies over the past including NOKIA, STMicroelectronics and SAMSUNG.
Stephan Roche
is an ICREA Research Professor, and leads the Theoretical and Computational Nanoscience group at ICN2, which focuses on quantum transport in Dirac materials. He pioneered the development of linear scaling computational approaches for wavepacket dynamics, Kubo conductivity, and Landauer-Büttiker conductance in disordered materials. He studied Theoretical Physics at ENS and UJF (France), received a PhD in Physics in 1996 (CNRS), and worked in Japan, Spain, and Germany. He was appointed Prof. assistant at UJF (2000) and CEA Researcher (2004), and received the Friedrich Wilhelm Bessel prize from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation (Germany). He is deputy leader of the Graphene Spintronics WP in the Graphene Flagship.
Aron W. Cummings
is a research staff member at ICN2. He received his PhD degree in Electrical Engineering from Arizona State University in 2009, joined Sandia National Laboratories as a postdoctoral researcher in 2010, and has been at ICN2 since 2013. His research focuses on spin and charge transport in electronic and optoelectronic devices, studied via large-scale quantum transport simulations.He is also currently responsible for product safety, intellectual property, and for collaboration projects. Mike led the company’s participation in several collaboration projects including: FP6 project Nanoplasma, ENIAC projects for 450mm silicon readiness EEMI450, EEMI450PR and E450LMDAP; and FP7 project Single Nanometre Manufacturing, in which the prototype ALE module was developed. He was named an ‘Oxford Instruments Fellow’ in 2016
SCIPROM is or has been involved in more than 30 FP projects in different thematic priorities and with different types of funding schemes including several projects with 20 or more participants (see http://sciprom.ch/projects/), incl. MIME (‘Mobility and inclusion in a multilingual Europe’, FP7), Rhapsody (‘Assessing risk and progression of pre- diabetes and type 2 diabetes to enable disease modification’, IMI2), E2SWITCH (‘Energy Efficient Tunnel FET Switches and Circuits’, FP7), and Bonseyes (‘Platform for Open Develop- ment of Systems of Artificial Intelligence‘, H2020). Our project managers have a substantial scientific back- ground with several years of research activities and sound experience in project management, including training in IP and financial issues. SCIPROM has extensive in-house knowledge in the creation of project websites incl. custom-made collaboration platforms and communication material (brochures, flyers, videos).
Dr. Kirsten Leufgen
Senior Project Manager, co-founder and executive director of SCIPROM. Responsible for the management of Swiss and international (EU FP4-8) research projects. She is a senior scientist in biophysical chemistry and has extensive knowledge of research policies and administration.
Dr. Peter Ulrich
Senior Project Manager and Webmaster, co-founder & technical director of SCIPROM. He is a physical chemist and senior scientist, with extensive experience in research management and IT.
Mr. Filippo Gander
Designer. Holding a Master in Social Sciences, he is a communication expert and an experienced web and print designer.
Ms. Dominique Stücker
Financial Officer, is a highly qualified accountant with 12 years experience in financial management of European research projects.
Dr. Véronique Gobry
Project Manager. Food industry engineer with considerable experience in quality control, project management and legal matters.
Please fill this form to send a message to the project responsible.
Hans Martin
Project coordinator
Senseair
Stationsgatan 12,
82471 Delsbo
+46.653.121.29
Kirsten Leufgen
Project manager
SCIPROM
Rue du Centre 70
CH-1025 St-Sulpice
+41.21.694.04.12
This project has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 825272 (ULISSES).